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Positive School Climate

  1. Osher, D., Spier, E., Kendziora, K., & Cai, C. (2009). Improving academic achievement through improving school climate and student connectedness. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA. This paper describes a study demonstrating that academic achievement could be improved by addressing school climate and student connectedness.
  2. Konishi, C., Hymel, S., Zumbo, B. D., & Li, Z. (2010). Do School Bullying and Student—Teacher Relationships Matter for Academic Achievement? A Multilevel Analysis. Canadian Journal of School Psychology, 25(1), 19-39. This study demonstrated there is an association between academic achievement with school climate and student-teacher connectedness.
  3. Wang, M. T., Selman, R. L., Dishion, T. J., & Stormshak, E. A. (2010). A tobit regression analysis of the covariation between middle school students’ perceived school climate and behavioral problems. Journal of Research on Adolescence, 20(2), 274-286. This study demonstrated that students who perceived their school in a positive light had fewer behavioral problems.
  4. Leithwood, K., Patten, S., & Jantzi, D. (2010). Testing a conception of how school leadership influences student learning. Educational Administration Quarterly, 46(5), 671-706. This study showed that 43% of the variation in academic achievement can be explained by teacherstudent relations, discipline climate, teacher commitment, trust between teacher-teacher, teacherstudent, teacher-parent, and student-parent, and positive home environment.
  5. Eliot, M., Cornell, D., Gregory, A., & Fan, X. (2010). Supportive school climate and student willingness to seek help for bullying and threats of violence. Journal of School Psychology, 48(6), 533-553. This study showed that students who perceived their teachers and school staff as supportive were more likely to seek help for bullying and threats of violence.
 
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